Place Value, Rounding, Addition, and Subtraction

Lesson 7

Objective

Read and write multi-digit numbers using base-ten numerals, number names, and expanded form.

Common Core Standards

Core Standards

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  • 4.NBT.A.2 — Read and write multi-digit whole numbers using base-ten numerals, number names, and expanded form. Compare two multi-digit numbers based on meanings of the digits in each place, using >, =, and < symbols to record the results of comparisons.

Foundational Standards

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  • 2.NBT.A.3

Criteria for Success

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  1. Convert from written form to standard and expanded form. 
  2. Convert from standard form to written and expanded form. 
  3. Convert from expanded form to standard and written form. 

Tips for Teachers

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  • Remember from Lesson 4 that when saying or writing a number in word form, the word “and” implies a decimal point and therefore should not be used when naming whole numbers. For example, 217,350 is read “two hundred seventeen thousand three hundred fifty,” not “two hundred and seventeen thousand three hundred and fifty.” Even though students have not yet seen decimals, it is important to read numbers correctly before they do.
  • This lesson does not immediately follow Lesson 4 so that there was more time for students to be comfortable reading numbers before being asked to write them in word form in this lesson. You may decide to move this lesson to after Lesson 4 and bump back Lessons 5 and 6.

Remote Learning Guidance

If you need to adapt or shorten this lesson for remote learning, we suggest prioritizing Anchor Tasks 1-3 (benefit from worked examples). Just complete Part (a) of each Anchor Task. Find more guidance on adapting our math curriculum for remote learning here.

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  • Problem Set
  • Student Handout Editor
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Anchor Tasks

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Problem 1

  1. A man in Massachusetts won the lottery yesterday. Look how much he won!

The lottery made a mistake when they printed his check, though—it’s missing a dollar amount! How would you write the total in that empty box?

  1. Use similar reasoning to write the following values in standard and expanded form.
    1. Two hundred seventy thousand eight hundred fifty
    2. Sixty-four thousand three

Guiding Questions

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Problem 2

Write each of the following in expanded and written form. 

  1. 27,085
  2. 601,408 
  3. 7,056

Guiding Questions

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References

EngageNY Mathematics Grade 4 Mathematics > Module 1 > Topic A > Lesson 4Concept Development

Grade 4 Mathematics > Module 1 > Topic A > Lesson 4 of the New York State Common Core Mathematics Curriculum from EngageNY and Great Minds. © 2015 Great Minds. Licensed by EngageNY of the New York State Education Department under the CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 US license. Accessed Dec. 2, 2016, 5:15 p.m..

Modified by The Match Foundation, Inc.

Problem 3

Write each of the following in standard and written form. 

  1.    700,000 + 8,000 + 500 + 70 + 3 
  2.    500,000 + 40,000 + 10 + 2
  3.    9,000 + 700 + 60

Guiding Questions

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References

EngageNY Mathematics Grade 4 Mathematics > Module 1 > Topic A > Lesson 4Concept Development

Grade 4 Mathematics > Module 1 > Topic A > Lesson 4 of the New York State Common Core Mathematics Curriculum from EngageNY and Great Minds. © 2015 Great Minds. Licensed by EngageNY of the New York State Education Department under the CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 US license. Accessed Dec. 2, 2016, 5:15 p.m..

Modified by The Match Foundation, Inc.

Problem Set & Homework

  • Problem Set

    • Problem Set Answer Key
  • Homework

    • Homework Answer Key

Discussion of Problem Set

  • Compare the numbers in the first two rows in #2. What do you notice?
  • Look at #2. What number words were tricky to write? Which number words can be confused with other number words? Why? What strategies did you use to spell number words? 
  • Look at #3. What other numbers can be read more than one way? Which way of reading a number best helps you solve? When?
  • What made the expanded form options in #4 different from the way we usually write it? Why do you think we usually write it from largest to smallest value? 
  • Two students discussed the importance of zero. Nate said that zero is not important while Jill said that zero is extremely important. Who is right? Why do you think so?
  • What role can zero play in a number?
  • How is expanded form related to the standard form of a number?
  • When might you use expanded form to solve a calculation?

Target Task

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Problem 1

Write the number 800,000 + 6,000 + 300 + 2 in standard and word form. 

References

EngageNY Mathematics Grade 4 Mathematics > Module 1 > Topic A > Lesson 4Exit Ticket, Question #1

Grade 4 Mathematics > Module 1 > Topic A > Lesson 4 of the New York State Common Core Mathematics Curriculum from EngageNY and Great Minds. © 2015 Great Minds. Licensed by EngageNY of the New York State Education Department under the CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 US license. Accessed Dec. 2, 2016, 5:15 p.m..

Modified by The Match Foundation, Inc.

Problem 2

Write one hundred sixty thousand, five hundred eighty-two in standard and expanded form.

References

EngageNY Mathematics Grade 4 Mathematics > Module 1 > Topic A > Lesson 4Exit Ticket, Question #2

Grade 4 Mathematics > Module 1 > Topic A > Lesson 4 of the New York State Common Core Mathematics Curriculum from EngageNY and Great Minds. © 2015 Great Minds. Licensed by EngageNY of the New York State Education Department under the CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 US license. Accessed Dec. 2, 2016, 5:15 p.m..

Modified by The Match Foundation, Inc.

Problem 3

Write 73,906 in word and expanded form.

Mastery Response

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Additional Practice

Unit Practice

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