Place Value, Rounding, Addition, and Subtraction

Lesson 4

Objective

Build numbers to 1,000,000 and write numbers to that place value in standard and unit form.

Materials and Resources

Common Core Standards

Core Standards

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  • 4.NBT.A.1 — Recognize that in a multi-digit whole number, a digit in one place represents ten times what it represents in the place to its right. For example, recognize that 700 ÷ 70 = 10 by applying concepts of place value and division.

  • 4.NBT.A.2 — Read and write multi-digit whole numbers using base-ten numerals, number names, and expanded form. Compare two multi-digit numbers based on meanings of the digits in each place, using >, =, and < symbols to record the results of comparisons.

Foundational Standards

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  • 2.NBT.A.1

  • 2.NBT.A.2

  • 3.NBT.A.3

Criteria for Success

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  1. Extend place value knowledge to the millions (or higher), recognizing the patterns within place value (i.e., ones, tens, and hundreds repeat within triples of units, thousands, millions, etc.) (MP.7).
  2. Visualize the magnitude of 1 million. 
  3. Appropriately place commas within numbers up to 1 million when they are presented in standard and unit forms.
  4. Convert between unit and standard form (i.e., 24,078 = 2 ten thousands 4 thousands 7 tens 8 ones).
  5. Read numbers in word form (e.g., 24,078 as “twenty-four thousand, seventy-eight). (Note: Students will not yet write numbers in word form.)

Tips for Teachers

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Before the Problem Set or at any point to give students more practice with reading numbers, you could have students play "Digit Ski" from Building Conceptual Understanding and Fluency Through Games by the Public Schools of North Carolina.

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Anchor Tasks

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Problem 1

Look at your paper base ten blocks. The ones piece is the smallest square. Then tens piece is a 10 x 1 strip. The hundreds piece is the larger 10 x 10 square.

  1. Use the paper base ten blocks to construct 1,000. Use tape as needed.
  2. Use the paper base ten blocks to construct 10,000. Use tape as needed.
  3. What comes next? What shape will it be?

Guiding Questions

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References

John A. Van de Walle Teaching Student-Centered Mathematics: Developmentally Appropriate Instruction for Grades 3-5 (Volume II)Activity 10.15

Van de Walle, John A. Teaching Student-Centered Mathematics: Developmentally Appropriate Instruction for Grades 3-5 (Volume II). Pearson, 2nd edition, 2013.

Modified by The Match Foundation, Inc.

Problem 2

  1. Look at the ones, tens, hundreds, and thousands base ten blocks. 
    1. What would you expect a ten thousands base ten block to look like? 
    2. What would you expect a hundred thousands base ten block to look like? 
    3. What comes next? What would you expect its base ten block to look like?
  2. What pattern do you notice in the shapes of the base ten blocks? What pattern do you notice in the names of the place values? ​​​​​​

Guiding Questions

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References

John A. Van de Walle Teaching Student-Centered Mathematics: Developmentally Appropriate Instruction for Grades 3-5 (Volume II)Activity 10.15 and Figure 10.8

Van de Walle, John A. Teaching Student-Centered Mathematics: Developmentally Appropriate Instruction for Grades 3-5 (Volume II). Pearson, 2nd edition, 2013.

Modified by The Match Foundation, Inc.

Problem 3

  1. Write 430325 in standard form with the correct placement of commas and read the number name. 
  2. Write 3 hundred thousands 2 ten thousands 4 hundreds 5 tens 7 ones in standard form with the correct placement of commas and read the number name.
  3. Write 50,438 in unit form.

Guiding Questions

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References

EngageNY Mathematics Grade 4 Mathematics > Module 1 > Topic A > Lesson 3Concept Development

Grade 4 Mathematics > Module 1 > Topic A > Lesson 3 of the New York State Common Core Mathematics Curriculum from EngageNY and Great Minds. © 2015 Great Minds. Licensed by EngageNY of the New York State Education Department under the CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 US license. Accessed Dec. 2, 2016, 5:15 p.m..

Modified by The Match Foundation, Inc.

Discussion of Problem Set

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  • How do you know where to place commas in a number? How is this related to three-dimensional representations of numbers? How is it related to the place value names?
  • How is the placement of commas related to how we read numbers?
  • What are the similarities and differences between standard and unit form? When might we use one over the other?
  • Look at #4. Explain how you knew the place value names without ever having hear them before. 

Target Task

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Problem 1

Write the following numbers in standard form. Be sure to place commas where appropriate. 

  1. 9 thousands 3 hundreds 4 ones
  2. 6 ten thousands 2 thousands 7 hundreds 8 tens 9 ones
  3. 1 hundred thousand 8 thousands 9 hundreds 5 tens 3 ones

References

EngageNY Mathematics Grade 4 Mathematics > Module 1 > Topic A > Lesson 3Exit Ticket

Grade 4 Mathematics > Module 1 > Topic A > Lesson 3 of the New York State Common Core Mathematics Curriculum from EngageNY and Great Minds. © 2015 Great Minds. Licensed by EngageNY of the New York State Education Department under the CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 US license. Accessed Dec. 2, 2016, 5:15 p.m..

Modified by The Match Foundation, Inc.

Problem 2

Write the following numbers in unit form. 

  1. 23,091
  2. 8,530
  3. 360,467

Mastery Response

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