Multiplication and Division, Part 1

Lesson 12

Objective

Solve one-step word problems involving multiplication and division using units of 3 and 4.

Materials and Resources

Common Core Standards

Core Standards

?

  • 3.OA.A.1 — Interpret products of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 5 × 7 as the total number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects each. For example, describe a context in which a total number of objects can be expressed as 5 × 7.

  • 3.OA.A.2 — Interpret whole-number quotients of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 56 ÷ 8 as the number of objects in each share when 56 objects are partitioned equally into 8 shares, or as a number of shares when 56 objects are partitioned into equal shares of 8 objects each. For example, describe a context in which a number of shares or a number of groups can be expressed as 56 ÷ 8.

  • 3.OA.A.3 — Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Criteria for Success

?

  1. Solve one-step word problems involving multiplication or division with units of 3 and 4, using a tape diagram to represent the problem if necessary (MP.4).
  2. Write a word problem to match a given image.  

Tips for Teachers

?

The word problems in today’s Anchor Tasks require a bit more interpretation than the word problems included in Lesson 10. This, combined with students not being as fluent with their 3s and 4s facts as their 2s, 5s, and 10s facts, encourages the use of tape diagrams to represent the problems. But, the problems in this lesson still involve discrete objects, e.g., sandwiches, markers, and tires. Students will see more abstract quantities in Lesson 15, e.g., money or length measurement. This should further encourage students to use tape diagrams to represent the problems, since one-to-one drawings for continuous quantities like amounts of money or length measurement is misleading. 

Fishtank Plus

Subscribe to Fishtank Plus to unlock access to additional resources for this lesson, including:

  • Problem Set
  • Student Handout Editor
  • Google Classrom Integration
  • Vocabulary Package

 

Anchor Tasks

?

Problem 1

Leah made sandwiches for her and her siblings every day during a week. She made 4 sandwiches each day. How many sandwiches did Leah make over the course of the week? 

Guiding Questions

Create a free account or sign in to access the Guiding Questions for this Anchor Problem.

Problem 2

Jose, Sam, and Zack have 24 markers altogether. If they each have the same number of markers, how many markers does Jose have? 

Guiding Questions

Create a free account or sign in to access the Guiding Questions for this Anchor Problem.

Problem 3

Cora went on a trip with her parents. She was bored at lunch and counted all the tires in the parking lot. If she counted 36 tires on cars, how many cars were in the parking lot? 

Guiding Questions

Create a free account or sign in to access the Guiding Questions for this Anchor Problem.

References

North Carolina Department of Public Instruction 3.OA TasksRoad Trip, Question #1

3.OA Tasks from the 3-5 Formative Instructional and Assessment Tasks for the Standards in Mathematics, made available by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction (NCDPI) Elementary Mathematics Consultants and their public school partners under the CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 license. Accessed Oct. 10, 2018, 3:44 p.m..

Discussion of Problem Set

?

  • How did you solve #2? Could you have drawn a tape diagram to represent it even though it was an array problem? Why? 
  • How did you solve #4? Since we don’t yet know how to skip-count by 8, how did you find the total? 
  • How did you solve in #5? How did you know there were groups of 3 even though there is no 3 in the problem? 
  • What problems did you write for #6? Which one was more challenging to write a problem for? 
  • How did you solve #7? Could you have drawn a tape diagram to represent it even though it was an array problem? Why? 
  • How did you solve #9? How did you know there were groups of 4 even though there is no 4 in the problem?

Target Task

?

Problem 1

Andrea has 21 apple slices. She uses 3 apple slices to decorate 1 pie. How many pies does Andrea make?

References

EngageNY Mathematics Grade 3 Mathematics > Module 1 > Topic D > Lesson 13Exit Ticket, Question #1

Grade 3 Mathematics > Module 1 > Topic D > Lesson 13 of the New York State Common Core Mathematics Curriculum from EngageNY and Great Minds. © 2015 Great Minds. Licensed by EngageNY of the New York State Education Department under the CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 US license. Accessed Dec. 2, 2016, 5:15 p.m..

Modified by The Match Foundation, Inc.

Problem 2

Arthur has 3 boxes of chocolate. Each box has 6 chocolates inside. How many chocolates does Arthur have altogether? 

References

EngageNY Mathematics Grade 3 Mathematics > Module 1 > Topic E > Lesson 14Exit Ticket

Grade 3 Mathematics > Module 1 > Topic E > Lesson 14 of the New York State Common Core Mathematics Curriculum from EngageNY and Great Minds. © 2015 Great Minds. Licensed by EngageNY of the New York State Education Department under the CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 US license. Accessed Dec. 2, 2016, 5:15 p.m..

Modified by The Match Foundation, Inc.

Problem 3

There are 32 soccer players on the field. They form 4 equal teams. How many players are on each team?

References

EngageNY Mathematics Grade 3 Mathematics > Module 1 > Topic D > Lesson 13Exit Ticket, Question #2

Grade 3 Mathematics > Module 1 > Topic D > Lesson 13 of the New York State Common Core Mathematics Curriculum from EngageNY and Great Minds. © 2015 Great Minds. Licensed by EngageNY of the New York State Education Department under the CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 US license. Accessed Dec. 2, 2016, 5:15 p.m..

Modified by The Match Foundation, Inc.

Mastery Response

?

Create a free account or sign in to view Mastery Response