Accepting Ourselves and Others

Students explore acceptance of themselves and others in order to start discussions about bullying, tolerance, acceptance, and forgiveness, and focus on identifying the central message in a longer text.

Unit Summary

In this unit, students read the core texts The Hundred Dresses and Garvey’s Choice as a way of exploring what it means to be accepting and tolerant of themselves and others. The Hundred Dresses challenges students to think about the different roles associated with bullying through the eyes of the narrator, who struggles with her own involvement with a classmate who is bullied. Garvey’s Choice illustrates the way others influence the way we see ourselves, both positively and negatively, and the power of accepting ourselves by tracing Garvey’s path to self-discovery and acceptance. Both texts are full of moments and messages that are easily relatable for students at this grade level. Therefore, it is our hope that the experiences of the characters in both texts will serve as a neutral launching point for deeper discussions about bullying, tolerance, acceptance, and forgiveness. 

In reading, the main focus of the unit is on identifying and tracing the central message across a longer text. Over the course of the text, students will develop a deep understanding of each character’s thoughts, feelings, and motivations, which will help them identify and explain how the central message is developed and conveyed through the characters. Students will also begin to understand how successive parts of a text build on each other to push the plot forward. Particularly with Garvey’s Choice, students will analyze the genre features of novels written in verse and how each part helps build and develop the central message. This unit also focused on point of view. Students will begin to notice the point of view in which a story is told and compare that with their own point of view.

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Unit Launch

Online learning modules that include short videos and readings to help teachers prepare to teach a unit.

 

Texts and Materials

Core Materials

See Text Selection Rationale

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Assessment

These assessments accompany this unit to help gauge student understanding of key unit content and skills. Additional progress monitoring suggestions are included throughout the unit.

Unit Prep

Essential Questions

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  • What different roles do people play in bullying? 
  • What does it mean to be accepting of ourselves? 
  • What does it mean to be accepting of others? 

Writing Focus Areas

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Sentence-Level Focus Areas

  • Use appositives to vary sentence structure
  • Edit for complete sentences and spelling
  • Write simple, compound, and complex sentences

In this unit, students are introduced to appositives in order to help them vary their sentences, especially topic and concluding sentences. This is another tool to help students write complex, interesting sentences. Students should continue to practice using other sentence expansion and combining strategies learned earlier in the year. 

Paragraph-Level Focus Areas

  • Use single-paragraph outlines to brainstorm cohesive paragraphs 
  • Understand components of a topic sentence
  • Differentiate between topic and supporting details 
  • Write concluding sentences 

Before students are able to write strong paragraphs, they must understand the components of a strong paragraph. Therefore, this unit focuses on introducing students to the components of a strong paragraph. Though students have written paragraphs earlier in the year, the focus here is on brainstorming details and creating strong outlines.

Narrative Writing Focus Areas

  • Use relevant text details or background knowledge from the text to develop characters, ideas, or situations
  • Write a sequence of events that unfolds naturally 
  • Use precise words and phrases to develop events and experiences
  • Provide a sense of closure

After reading The Hundred Dresses students will write a continuation of the text. Focus for narrative writing is on creating a structure and plot that connects to the text and task.

Opinion Writing Focus Areas

  • Clearly state an opinion
  • Provide reasons that support an opinion
  • Use appropriate transition words to connect your reasons
  • Include a concluding statement 

After reading Garvey’s Choice, students will write a letter to their principal to convince him or her to take action against bullying in their school. Students must brainstorm an opinion about which anti-bullying strategy to implement, decide which evidence is most convincing, and use appropriate transition words to connect their evidence. Finally, they practice addressing an envelope when sending the letter. 

Related Teacher Tools:

Fluency Focus Areas

  • Readers adhere to punctuation, particularly commas. 
  • Readers read verse with rhythm and flow. 
  • Readers self-correct when reading difficult words and sentence structures. 
  • Readers adjust reading rate depending on the purpose for reading and task.

This unit has a few fluency focuses. The Hundred Dresses is a slightly archaic text and includes different sentence structures and vocabulary than students are familiar with. Therefore, in order to read the text fluently students will need modeling and support with how to read sentences with multiple clauses and how to self-correct and reread after problem solving a tricky sentence structure. The language in Garvey’s Choice is much simpler, however, the text is written in verse. Reading texts in verse is more free flowing and rhythmic, and this should be modeled. 

Teachers should plan to do fluency checkpoints at several points throughout a unit. Have students grade themselves or a friend on the Reading Fluency Rubric. If a student scores a 2 or lower on any of the sections, we offer some ideas for additional fluency instruction and support in our Fluency Assessment Package.

At the end of each unit, teachers should assess each student using the unit’s fluency assessment found in the Fluency Assessment Package. This assessment is quick. Teachers should plan to pull students one-on-one to do this while the rest of the class is independently reading or writing.

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Fluency Package

Additional tools to help monitor and support students’ reading fluency.

Speaking and Listening Focus Areas

  • Build on partner's ideas. Students seek to genuinely understand what their peers are saying, and then build on. 
  • Paraphrase to make meaning. Students paraphrase what others are saying in order to keep track of the key ideas in a discussion. 
  • Questioning and clarifying to build understanding. Students seek to clarify a particular point a student makes by asking follow up questions. 

In unit three, students began to move beyond their own reasoning and began to respond and interact with the reasoning of others. They learned how to listen to and learn from their peers, and began to refine and clarify their own thinking  based on others' ideas. In this unit students continue to refine and clarify their own thinking based on others' ideas. 

When building on to partner's ideas, students should seek to genuinely understand what their peers are saying and build on. Ideas should not be random, disconnected, or replace a previous idea. Rather, ideas should zoom in on a particular idea that was said, make a connection between a previous idea and a new idea, or challenge a particular part of an idea. Students should also begin to paraphrase what others are saying in order to keep track of the key ideas in a discussion. This involves listening carefully to a speaker, organizing the speaker's points, inferring which points are important, and then putting it all in one's own words. Finally, students work on seeking to clarify a particular points a student made by asking follow-up questions.

Guidance on teacher moves to support these discussion focuses can be found in our Guide to Academic Discourse (below).

Vocabulary

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Below are all of the unit vocabulary words. Prior to teaching the unit, we recommend teachers decide which words to prioritize. We also recommend that teachers decide which affixes to prioritize. See our teacher tool Prepping Unit Vocabulary (below) for more guidance on which words to pick as priority words.

Text-based

"meet your match" absentmindedly amends casualness consoled coward deliberately disgracefully enraged eternal exquisite forbidding impulsively incredulous incredulously inseparable intently lavish mind mock ramble relieved self-image swiftly timid torment unintelligible vividly

Root/Affix

-ful -ly -ness dis- en- in- un-

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Vocabulary Package

Additional vocabulary tools that help reinforce and support student vocabulary development.

Lesson Map

1

  • The Hundred Dresses pg. 2 – 7

    RL.3.3

Explain the significance of “have fun with her” and how it relates to the author’s description of characters. 

2

  • The Hundred Dresses pg. 8 – 18

    RL.3.3

Describe how Wanda is treated and the role Peggy and Maddie play in the way Wanda is treated.

3

  • The Hundred Dresses pg. 8 – 18 — (Close Read)

    RL.3.3

    RL.3.6

Defend if Maddie thinks the way they are treating Wanda is right and if you agree or disagree.

4

Writing

    L.3.1.a

    L.3.1.i

Use appositives to make sentences more interesting.

5

  • The Hundred Dresses pg. 19 – 28

    RL.3.3

    RL.3.5

Describe what types of details Maddie remembers about the day the hundred dresses game began.

6

  • The Hundred Dresses pg. 28 – 33

    RL.3.3

    RL.3.5

    RL.3.6

Explain how the dress game began and how Peggy’s actions impacted the entire community. 

7

  • The Hundred Dresses pg. 34 – 39

    RL.3.3

    RL.3.6

Explain how the author shows that Maddie is conflicted about the way she treats Wanda and if you agree with Maddie’s rationalization of her actions.

8Essential Task

Discussion & Writing

  • The Hundred Dresses

    RL.3.3

    W.3.1

    SL.3.1

    SL.3.4

Analyze the roles Peggy, Maddie, and Wanda play in the hundred dresses game.

9

  • The Hundred Dresses pg. 40 – 45 — (Stop at "Draw!")

    RL.3.5

Analyze and explain how the illustrations on pp. 42–43 contribute to a reader’s understanding of the text.

10

  • The Hundred Dresses pg. 45 – 50

    RL.3.3

Explain the effect the letter has on Maddie, Peggy, and Miss Mason.

11

Writing

    W.3.1

    W.3.1.a

    W.3.1.b

    W.3.1.d

Brainstorm before writing to make paragraphs coherent and cohesive.

12

  • The Hundred Dresses pg. 51 – 58

    RL.3.3

Explain why Maddie and Peggy left the house feeling “downcast and discouraged,” and whether or not each girl is beginning to change.

13

  • The Hundred Dresses pg. 59 – 63

    RL.3.2

    RL.3.3

    RL.3.6

Explain what conclusion Maddie reaches after reflecting on what happened with Wanda and if you agree with the conclusion Maddie reaches.

14

  • The Hundred Dresses pg. 64 – 70

    RL.3.3

    RL.3.6

Analyze why Maddie and Peggy decided to write a letter to Wanda and what impact it had on both of them.

15Essential Task

  • The Hundred Dresses pg. 71 – 80

    RL.3.3

Explain the impact Wanda’s letter has on Maddie and Peggy.

16

Discussion & Writing

  • The Hundred Dresses

    RL.3.3

    SL.3.1

    SL.3.3

    SL.3.4

Analyze how Peggy, Maddie, and Wanda’s roles in the hundred dresses game have evolved and why by analyzing details that describe characters in depth.

17

Opinion Writing

    RL.3.3

    W.3.1

    W.3.1.a

    W.3.1.b

    W.3.1.d

Brainstorm before writing to make paragraphs coherent and cohesive. 

18

Discussion

  • The Hundred Dresses

    RL.3.2

    W.3.1

    SL.3.1

    SL.3.1.c

    SL.3.1.d

Identify the central message of The Hundred Dresses and explain how it was conveyed through key details in the text. 

19

2 days

Narrative Writing

    W.3.3

    W.3.3.a

    W.3.3.b

    W.3.3.d

    L.3.1.a

Write a continuation of The Hundred Dresses by using relevant details from the text to write a story with a clear sequence of events and descriptive details.

20

  • Garvey's Choice pg. 1 – 18

    RL.3.3

    RL.3.5

    RL.3.6

Analyze how the poems on pp. 1–18 work together to build a deeper picture of the way Garvey feels about himself and the way his dad views him.

21

  • Garvey's Choice pg. 19 – 32

    RL.3.3

    RL.3.5

Explain why Garvey states that he would find a patch of earth and pull it up over his head and what details the author includes in previous poems to support this.

22

  • Garvey's Choice pg. 33 – 43

    RL.3.3

    RL.3.5

Analyze how the poems help a reader build a deeper understanding of how Garvey views himself and how his self-image influences his actions. 

23

  • Garvey's Choice pg. 44 – 56

    RL.3.3

    RL.3.5

Analyze how the poems help a reader build a deeper understanding of how the idea of chorus both challenged and grew Garvey’s self-image.

24

Writing

    L.3.1

    L.3.1.a

    L.3.1.i

Use appositives to make sentences more interesting.

25

  • Garvey's Choice pg. 57 – 69

    RL.3.3

    RL.3.5

Analyze how each poem helps a reader build a deeper understanding of how joining chorus and meeting Manny influences Garvey. 

26Essential Task

  • Garvey's Choice pg. 70 – 78

    RL.3.3

    RL.3.5

Explain how each poem helps a reader build a deeper understanding of how Garvey is learning and growing.

27

  • Garvey's Choice pg. 79 – 90

    RL.3.3

    RL.3.5

Analyze how each poem helps a reader build a deeper understanding of the ways that Garvey continues to grow and change.

28

  • Garvey's Choice pg. 91 – 105

    RL.3.2

    RL.3.3

    RL.3.5

Analyze how each poem helps a reader build a deeper understanding of how Garvey changed and what factors caused the change.

29

Discussion & Writing

  • Garvey's Choice

    RL.3.2

    W.3.1

    SL.3.1

    SL.3.1.c

    SL.3.1.d

Identify the central message of Garvey’s Choice and explain how it was conveyed through key details in the text. 

30

Discussion

  • Garvey's Choice

  • The Hundred Dresses

    RL.3.2

    RL.3.9

    SL.3.1

    SL.3.1.c

    SL.3.1.d

Compare and contrast Maddie and Garvey’s experiences with bullying and self-image and what they both learned about themselves, by comparing and contrasting key details from two texts.

31

Assessment

32

5 days

Opinion Writing

    W.3.1

    W.3.1.a

    W.3.1.b

    W.3.1.d

    L.3.1

    L.3.1.i

    L.3.2

    L.3.2.b

Write an opinion piece to convince your principal to use your ideas to prevent bullying at your school. 

Common Core Standards

Language Standards
  • L.3.1 — Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

  • L.3.1.a — Explain the function of nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs in general and their functions in particular sentences.

  • L.3.1.i — Produce simple, compound, and complex sentences.

  • L.3.2 — Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

  • L.3.2.a — Capitalize appropriate words in titles.

  • L.3.2.b — Use commas in addresses.

Reading Standards for Literature
  • RL.3.2 — Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text.

  • RL.3.3 — Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.

  • RL.3.5 — Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections.

  • RL.3.6 — Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters.

  • RL.3.9 — Compare and contrast the themes, settings, and plots of stories written by the same author about the same or similar characters (e.g., in books from a series).

Speaking and Listening Standards
  • SL.3.1 — Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 3 topics and texts, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly.

  • SL.3.1.c — Ask questions to check understanding of information presented, stay on topic, and link their comments to the remarks of others.

  • SL.3.1.d — Explain their own ideas and understanding in light of the discussion.

  • SL.3.3 — Ask and answer questions about information from a speaker, offering appropriate elaboration and detail.

  • SL.3.4 — Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience with appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details, speaking clearly at an understandable pace.

Writing Standards
  • W.3.1 — Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons.

  • W.3.1.a — Introduce the topic or text they are writing about, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure that lists reasons.

  • W.3.1.b — Provide reasons that support the opinion.

  • W.3.1.d — Provide a concluding statement or section.

  • W.3.3 — Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.

  • W.3.3.a — Establish a situation and introduce a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally.

  • W.3.3.b — Use dialogue and descriptions of actions, thoughts, and feelings to develop experiences and events or show the response of characters to situations.

  • W.3.3.d — Provide a sense of closure.

Sprial Standards

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L.3.1.g

L.3.2.b

L.3.2.d

L.3.3.a

L.3.4

L.3.4.b

L.3.5.c

L.3.6

RF.3.3

RF.3.4

RL.3.1

RL.3.10

RL.3.4

RL.3.7

SL.3.1

SL.3.1.a

SL.3.1.b

SL.3.6

W.3.10

W.3.4

W.3.5

W.3.6