Place Value, Rounding, Addition, and Subtraction

Lesson 3

Objective

Model and write numbers to 10,000 with more than 9 of any unit in standard and unit form.

Common Core Standards

Core Standards

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  • 4.NBT.A.1 — Recognize that in a multi-digit whole number, a digit in one place represents ten times what it represents in the place to its right. For example, recognize that 700 ÷ 70 = 10 by applying concepts of place value and division.

  • 4.NBT.A.2 — Read and write multi-digit whole numbers using base-ten numerals, number names, and expanded form. Compare two multi-digit numbers based on meanings of the digits in each place, using >, =, and < symbols to record the results of comparisons.

  • 4.NBT.A.3 — Use place value understanding to round multi-digit whole numbers to any place.

Foundational Standards

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  • 2.NBT.A.1

  • 2.NBT.A.2

  • 2.NBT.A.3

Criteria for Success

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  1. Regroup 10 units into 1 of the next largest unit on a place value chart.
  2. Regroup 1 unit into 10 of the next smallest unit on a place value chart.
  3. Convert between nontraditional unit form (i.e., unit form with more than 9 of any kind of unit) and standard form.
  4. Identify errors in reasoning related to the above.

Tips for Teachers

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Anchor Tasks

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Problem 1

Ms. Glynn wants to model the number 2,213 with base ten blocks, but she only has 1 thousand block, as shown below. She has lots of hundreds, tens, and ones blocks. 

How can she make this number using the blocks she has?

Guiding Questions

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References

Achievement First Grade 4, Unit 2, Lesson 3 (2016-2017)

Grade 4, Unit 2, Lesson 3 (2016-2017) is made available by Achievement First as a part of their Open Source web portal under a CC BY 4.0 license. Copyright © 1999-2017 Achievement First. Accessed Sept. 13, 2017, 2 p.m..

Modified by The Match Foundation, Inc.

Problem 2

  1. What number represents the same amount as 14 hundreds 23 tens?
  2. What are two different ways you could represent 5,641?

Guiding Questions

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References

Illustrative Mathematics Regrouping

Regrouping, accessed on Sept. 26, 2018, 11:45 a.m., is licensed by Illustrative Mathematics under either the CC BY 4.0 or CC BY-NC-SA 4.0. For further information, contact Illustrative Mathematics.

Modified by The Match Foundation, Inc.

Problem Set & Homework

  • Problem Set

    • Problem Set Answer Key
  • Homework

    • Homework Answer Key

Discussion of Problem Set

  • Look at #1b. How did you model 2,130 with no more than 1 ten? Is there another way to model it that still meets that criteria?
  • Look at #2e. Why is the digit in the ones place a 0, despite the way the number was originally written there were many ones?
  • Look at #3. Is Miquel correct? What number was his answer actually equivalent to? How would you fix his answer so that it was correct?

Target Task

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Problem 1

Jeremy says he can write 1,456 as 14 thousands 56 ones. Is he correct? Why or why not?

Problem 2

Fill out the following table.

Unit form Standard form
4 thousands 37 tens  
8 thousands 16 hundreds 33 tens 2 ones  
3 thousands 2 hundreds 4 tens 17 ones  

Mastery Response

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Additional Practice

Unit Practice

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