Multiplication and Division, Part 1

Lesson 9

Objective

Solve one-step word problems involving multiplication and division using units of 2, 5, and 10.

Materials and Resources

Common Core Standards

Core Standards

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  • 3.OA.A.1 — Interpret products of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 5 × 7 as the total number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects each. For example, describe a context in which a total number of objects can be expressed as 5 × 7.

  • 3.OA.A.2 — Interpret whole-number quotients of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 56 ÷ 8 as the number of objects in each share when 56 objects are partitioned equally into 8 shares, or as a number of shares when 56 objects are partitioned into equal shares of 8 objects each. For example, describe a context in which a number of shares or a number of groups can be expressed as 56 ÷ 8.

  • 3.OA.A.3 — Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Criteria for Success

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  1. Solve one-step word problems involving multiplication or division with units of 2, 5, or 10, using a tape diagram to represent the problem if necessary (MP.4).
  2. Write a word problem to match a given image. 

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Anchor Tasks

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Problem 1

Mr. Seegers is making teams for field day. He made 10 relay teams with 4 relay runners on each team. How many students are running the relay in total? 

Guiding Questions

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Problem 2

Mr. Ernst is working with a group of 15 students. He splits them into five groups to play a review game. How many students are in each group?

Guiding Questions

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Problem 3

Ms. Glynn decides to put her students into groups of 2 to work on a project together. She has 20 students in her class. How many groups of two did Ms. Glynn make?

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Discussion of Problem Set

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  • Let’s write equations to represent #1 and #3. What do you notice about the numbers involved in both? What do you wonder? 
  • How did you solve #2? Since we don’t yet know how to skip-count by 7, how did you find the total? 
  • How did you solve #4? Could you have drawn a tape diagram to represent it even though it was an array problem? Why? 
  • What problems did you write for #5? Which one was more challenging to write a problem for? 
  • How did you solve #7? If you didn’t want to draw 50 fish but still wanted to draw a model to help you solve, what could you have drawn? 
  • How did you solve in #9? How did you know there were 2 groups, even though there is no 2 in the problem? 
  • How did you determine the number of eggs Edward stocked in #10a? If I counted the number of eggs in the 5 cartons in the picture, what could I have done to find the number of eggs in the 10 total cartons? Why is that possible? 
  • What equation did you write for #10b? How did you know that was correct even though we don’t know how to solve it yet?

Target Task

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Problem 1

Ms. McCarty has 8 stickers. She puts 2 stickers on each homework paper and has no more left. How many homework papers does she have?

References

EngageNY Mathematics Grade 3 Mathematics > Module 1 > Topic D > Lesson 11Exit Ticket

Grade 3 Mathematics > Module 1 > Topic D > Lesson 11 of the New York State Common Core Mathematics Curriculum from EngageNY and Great Minds. © 2015 Great Minds. Licensed by EngageNY of the New York State Education Department under the CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 US license. Accessed Dec. 2, 2016, 5:15 p.m..

Modified by The Match Foundation, Inc.

Problem 2

Jonathan is making lemonade for his lemonade stand. The recipe says you need 2 cups of sugar in each pitcher of lemonade. Jonathan wants to make 10 pitchers of lemonade. How many cups of sugar will he need?

Problem 3

Will has 45 toy trucks. He wants to put an equal amount of trucks into 5 buckets. How many trucks can Will put into each bucket?

References

Howard County Public School System 3.OA.3 - About the Math, Learning Targets, and RigorAssessment Task "Solve World Problem 10", Question #1

3.OA.3 - About the Math, Learning Targets, and Rigor is made available by the Howard County Public School System under a CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 license. © 2013-2014 Elementary Mathematics Office Howard County Public School System. Accessed Oct. 10, 2018, 1:21 p.m..

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