American Literature

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Course Summary

This American Literature course for 11th grade students is grounded in the Common Core Standards for English Language Arts, the expectations of the new SAT, and on Match School’s approach to teaching English as outlined in our Program Overview document. Writing, vocabulary development, readings of informational texts, and opportunities to develop speaking and listening skills are all included in the course, with the primary emphasis placed on students’ development of the skills described in the Reading Literature Standards. During this year-long course, students read five novels and a number of paired passages—short stories, poems, and nonfiction—that serve to enrich students’ understanding of the motifs, symbols, and themes of the novels. The texts are thematically linked, and students explore thematic questions related to racism, identity, truth, reality, human nature and the American Dream over the course of the year. The units are designed to be flexible in length, depending on the amount of reading students are expected to do at home.

Course Map

Unit 1 Coming 10/17

The Scarlet Letter

Unit 2 36 Lessons

Invisible Man

Unit 3 15 Lessons

The Glass Menagerie

Unit 4 Coming 8/17

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest

Unit 5 Coming 9/17

Dreaming in Cuban

How to Use This Course

 

English Language Arts at Match

At Match Education we have ambitious goals for our ELA program. Through our teaching, we strive to transform our scholars into critical readers, writers, and thinkers, and we seek to widen our students’ perspectives and deepen their character so that they can better understand themselves and the world around them.

Our ELA curriculum is designed around several core beliefs about how students learn best. These beliefs drive the decisions we make about what to teach and how to teach it.

  1. Text First vs. Skills First: We believe in the power of rich and nuanced texts to spark students’ thinking.

  2. Content Selection: We believe selected texts must both affirm our scholars’ cultures and expose them to great literature.

  3. Writing Instruction: We believe writing instruction should teach scholars to construct and convey persuasive arguments, and express their own voices.

  4. Discussion: We believe discussion is a powerful tool for testing ideas out and strengthening thinking.

  5. Word Knowledge: We believe in the importance of building word knowledge through both explicit instruction and exposure to content knowledge.

  6. Lifelong Learning: We believe that teachers should cultivate voracious, inquisitive readers, writers, and thinkers.


For more information, view our full English Language Arts Program Overview.